Why a Full-Body Workout Routine Is the Best Way to Build Muscle

Updated on January 15, 2018
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David is an army trained biomedical scientific officer, writer, and lifetime health and fitness enthusiast.

Full body workouts build muscle fast
Full body workouts build muscle fast | Source

Use a Full-Body Workout to Build Muscle

If you want to build muscle mass, there are hundreds of different training programs you could choose from to help you achieve that goal. And although many of them will give you decent results, at least for a while, if you want to build the maximum amount of muscle in the shortest possible time, you can’t beat a full-body workout routine.

The advice and workout suggestions that follow are especially beneficial for a beginner or early intermediate lifters and for those who have noticed little progress from their attempts to build muscle so far.

The Best Full-Body Workout

All you really need is a squat, a lunge or deadlift variation, an upper-body push, and an upper-body pull. Do 3-4 sets of 5-8 reps.

Why a Full-Body Workout?

If you go to the gym regularly you’ll know that body part splits, training one or two muscle groups per day, are very popular. For instance, focusing on the chest on Monday, the back on Tuesday, legs on Wednesday, shoulders on Thursday, and arms on Friday.

But the only real reason a beginner would ever organize their workout this way is that it's what all the top bodybuilders do. However, what works for top bodybuilders may not work for the rest of us. This is because competitive bodybuilders take a lot of steroids to enhance their muscle growth. They also have really great genetics. And on top of this, they are very near their limits in terms of how much muscle they can put on. They need a very large amount of volume and intensity in order to stimulate further growth. And the only way they can achieve this is to use body part splits.

But if you are genetically average and simply want to put on 20-30 pounds of muscle as quickly as possible, a full-body workout is the best way to go.

Full-body workouts are the best way to build muscle because they allow you to train all your major muscle groups more often. Visit the gym three times a week for best results. This, of course, means you get more frequent growth stimulation, which leads to greater muscle growth over time—provided you can recover from it.

Another reason this type of training works so well is that the focus of your workouts tends to be on compound exercises. This is because compound exercises enable you to train more total muscle tissue in less time, so you can work your whole body quickly and efficiently. Compound exercises also produce a much higher level of hormonal response than isolation exercises. And this again causes more muscle growth.

So a full-body workout can pack on muscle more quickly than anything else, provided that you know how to structure the routine in the right way.

Leroy Colbert Explains Why Full-Body Workouts Are Superior to Body Part Splits

How to Structure a Full-Body Workout Routine

  1. Don't do exactly the same workout routine every time you go to the gym, as this will soon lead to recovery issues. Instead, alternate two (or even three, if you are more advanced) different routines over the course of the week.
  2. Your workouts should not be too long. A big mistake many people make is doing too many exercises. You can work your whole body very well with just three or four exercises. Six is the most you should do. Doing more than this will only make it more difficult for you to recover, and this will limit your gains.
  3. All you really need for an effective full-body workout is a squat, lunge or deadlift variation, an upper-body push, and an upper-body pull. You can add in some additional arm work at the end if you wish, but that’s about it. Simply alternating between these two workouts over your three weekly visits to the gym will give you all the growth stimulation you need to ensure maximum progress.

As an example, a simple, but highly effective routine might look something like this:

Full-Body Workout Routines for Rapid Muscle Growth

Workout 1
Workout 2
Squat
Deadlift
Bench Press
Overhead Press
Bent-Over Row
Chin-Ups
Barbell Curls
Parallel Bar Dips
3-4 sets of 5-8 reps

Stick With Two for a Few Months

If you are a complete beginner, stick with alternating between the two workouts above for at least for your first few months. After that you can add in an extra exercise or two if you wish.

After a few months, you may wish to alternate between three different workouts so each body part is worked just once per week, but each exercise is still being worked three times per week. This will further help with recovery, enabling better consistent long-term progress to be made.

An example of a three-day full body workout program might look like this:

Three-Day Full-Body Workout Program

Monday
Wednesday
Friday
Squat
Deadlift
Leg Press
Incline Bench Press
Overhead Press
Bench Press
Dumbbell Row
Pull-Ups
Pulldowns
Barbell Curls
Parallel Bar Dips
Hammer Curls
3-4 sets of 5-8 reps

When to Increase the Weight

The idea is to increase the weight when you can do 8 reps on all 3 sets. If you do 8 on your first set, you should be able to do it on all of them, as you should be stopping your first set a rep or two short of failure. The only reason to go below 8 on subsequent sets is if your rest periods are too short. If you push to your max on all your sets, your progress will grind to a halt more quickly than if you hold back a little.

Leroy Gives More Information on Full-Body Training

What About Sets and Reps?

Another important factor to consider is your training volume. That is the number of sets and reps you perform. Most people will find they’ll get the best results by working in the 5 – 8 rep range most of the time (a little higher for your arm work). This builds hard, dense muscle, and is also great for making gains in strength.

Occasionally, however, you could use higher reps (10 – 12) to create additional growth through sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. That is an expansion of the fluid components of the muscle cells. And going down to 2 or 3 reps for a while will help build more strength. This is important as it will mean you will then be able to use more weight for the higher reps, which will result in even more gains in muscle size. Gradually increasing the weight over the course of a workout program is called progressive overload.

So most of the time your training should consist of around 3-4 sets of 5-8 reps (after a couple of warm-up sets) per exercise.

At a later date, you can switch to 3 sets of 10-12 reps for a month or two. And after that do 4-8 sets of doubles or triples for a while.

Vary Your Workout

It may also be a good idea to change some of your exercises occasionally too, as this will prevent your body from getting too accustomed to them. However, the principle of "muscle confusion," which states you should be changing your exercises on a regular basis, is a myth. Think of powerlifters and Olympic lifters. They use the same exercises all the time yet still manage to build enormous strength and massive muscle size.

Whilst body part splits can have their role to play for more advanced trainees, if you want to pack on as much muscle size to your frame as quickly as possible, do a full body workout routine in the way described here. Combine this with a good muscle building diet, and get sufficient rest and sleep, and you’ll be certain to make the best gains of your life.

Which method of training do you prefer?

See results

© 2012 David

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    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 weeks ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes; that's how it would be done. Every other day, or three times per week, alternating. It's not too much as long as you only do one or two exercises per body part.

    • profile image

      Pete 2 weeks ago

      Hi Dave

      What do you think of the Chest,Shoulders,Back workout on day 1

      Then limbs on next workout on a every other day basis

      Dorian started out like this do you think it’s too much in one workout

      Thanks

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 weeks ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes I think it's a good split but not the best for newbies who would do better with a full body routine. Once you've been training a while and built a decent base, then yes this is fine, and it's what a lot of the old shcool trainers might recommend.

    • profile image

      Pete 2 weeks ago

      Hi Dave

      Quick question what do you think of this split that Dorian did as a newbie

      Workout1. Chest,Back,Shoulders

      Workout2. Limbs

      Regards

      Pete

      Happy New Year

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 3 weeks ago from Chesterfield, UK

      The only way you can hit a body part every 48 - 72 hours, training 3 days per week, is to do full body workouts. But I wouldn't recommend that for an advanced lifter; nor would I recommend hitting a body part every 48 - 72 hours anyway. I would alternate upper, lower, upper, lower, which would mean you'd be hitting each muscle every 4 - 5 days, but that's ideal for an intermediate or advanced lifter anyway.

    • profile image

      Pete 3 weeks ago

      Dave

      Just a quick question if your an advanced lifter who can only train 3 days a week and wanting to hit muscle at least every 48-72 hours how would you go about doing your workout

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 4 weeks ago from Chesterfield, UK

      I know exactly what you mean about overtraining quickly with too much volume as I'm exactly the same. And yes, being over 40 does not help in that regard.

      So you could do an abbreviated routine such as:

      1. Squat, Leg Curl, Bench Press, Seated Dumbbell Press, Calf Raise.

      2. Rack Pull, Bent-over Row, Pull-Ups, Barbell Curl, Skullcrushers.

      Or you could do a more complete program if you feel you have the energy for it. This could be like this:

      1. Squat, Leg Press, Leg Curl, Bench Press, Incline Dumbbell Press, Overhead Press, Lateral Raise

      2. Rack Pull, Bent-over Row, Pull-Ups, Barbell Curl, Skullcrushers, Calf Raise.

      Or customise it to suit yourself; but hope that helps.

    • profile image

      Pete 4 weeks ago

      Sorry to bother you again, are you able to give an example of a good (Legs,Chest,Shoulder) & Back&Arm workout done every other day to hit muscle 4-5 days week, I tend to overtrain quick with too much volume maybe due to being over 40 ☹️ Which is not a bad thing it’s just being mindful of it and working in tune with it.

      Thanks sorry to keep bothering you

      Kind Regards

      Pete

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 5 weeks ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Thanks Peter; Merry Christmas to you too.

    • profile image

      Peter 5 weeks ago

      Amazing thanks Dave

      Best Wishes

      Merry Christmas

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 5 weeks ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Oh, ok. In that case you would do legs with chest and shoulders, and then do back with arms and calves.

    • profile image

      Peter 5 weeks ago

      Thanks Dave great information,

      Looks a solid split

      I just want to incorporate legs in some way into the push/pull so I train muscles every.4-5 days instead of doing a push/pull/legs where would you slot legs into a push/pull?

      Thanks so much

      Pete

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 5 weeks ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Hi Pete

      Glad you made some good gains with that. For push/pull/legs there are a few approaches you could take, but for most people a really good way to set it up would look something like this:

      Legs: Squat, Romanian Deadlift, Leg Press, Leg Curl, Calf Raise.

      Push: Bench Press, Incline Dumbbell Press, Overhead Press, Lateral Raise, Skullcrushers

      Pull: Bent-over Row, Pull-Ups, Face Pulls, Barbell Curl, Dumbbell Hammer Curl.

      Best of luck again.

    • profile image

      Pete 5 weeks ago

      Hi Dave,

      Hope you are well, I wanted to say massive thank you I have made amazing gains with this workout you gave me 3 days a week

      Monday - 3 x 5

      Squats, Bench Press, Bent-over Row, Overhead Press.

      Wednesday - 3 x 10 - 12

      Leg Press, Parallel Bar Dips, Pull-Ups, Lateral Raises, EZ Curl, Skullcrushers.

      Friday - 3 x 6 - 8

      Front Squat, Romanian Deadlift, Incline DB Bench Press, Cable Row, Seated DB Press.

      I am ready to do a Push/Pull split every other day so each muscle is worked every 4-5 days, please can you give me some ideas?

      Thanks

      Pete

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 8 weeks ago from Chesterfield, UK

      You can as long as you are recovering ok. But if you find you are getting issues in that respect go back to the curls.

    • profile image

      Gymnewbie 8 weeks ago

      Hi, thanks for replying. Could I replace bicep curls with pull ups on the two day routine? so pull ups day A and chin ups day B?

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes, a complete beginner will do better with two workouts in ABA format.

    • profile image

      Gymnewbie 2 months ago

      Hi Dave

      For a complete beginner is it better to start with two full body workouts three times a week in a ABA format or do three full bodys in a ABC format with all different exercises in each? Is one method better than the other? Thanks

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes, but you won't be able to keep on improving at that rate for long. So later you will need to do sets of 6, then 7, then 8 etc. And later still you will need to just add a rep to your last set first; then your penultimate set, and then all 3 sets before increasing. That method should keep you going for a long time though. Wish someone had told me that years ago.

    • profile image

      TANVEER 2 months ago

      Hi Dave,

      is it ok to perform workout A

      first time with 6 reps next time with 8 then next time with ten and then next time with 12 reps with the same weight. Then increase the weight and recycle it in the above manner.

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 3 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      I would say yes, no problem. But Mehdi might have different ideas. Basically you can do what you want, but some things may help and others may not. I'm sure that adding a couple of sets of dips to one workout and pull-ups to the other could only be beneficial though.

    • profile image

      Pete 3 months ago

      Hi Dave,

      Just quick question can you add Dips and Pull-ups to stronglifts?

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 3 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      You are welcome Peter. Best of luck.

    • profile image

      Peter 3 months ago

      Thank you so much Dave

      All the best my friend

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 3 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Try this:

      Monday - 3 x 5

      Squats, Bench Press, Bent-over Row, Overhead Press.

      Wednesday - 3 x 10 - 12

      Leg Press, Parallel Bar Dips, Pull-Ups, Lateral Raises, EZ Curl, Skullcrushers.

      Friday - 3 x 6 - 8

      Front Squat, Romanian Deadlift, Incline DB Bench Press, Cable Row, Seated DB Press.

      You can add in some ab and/or calf work at the end if you wish.

      I've suggested 3 x 5 on Monday, as 5 x 5 sets across can quickly get too demanding for intermediate trainees and will lead to an early plateau.

    • profile image

      Peter 3 months ago

      Hi Dave

      please give me a 3 day full body workout utilising the heavy/light/medium system I enjoy one day working in the 5x5 then following day 8-12 then moderate day 6-8 Reps

      Thanks so much

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 3 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes, that's right. And that can be useful for more advanced trainees. But it's certainly not the ideal way to train for beginners who simply don't need to "focus on one or two body parts". Most people in their first couple of years training will do far better on full body workouts. And from there they should transition to upper/lower splits.

    • profile image

      Smart guy 3 months ago

      People use splits because it allows them to maximize training on one or two body parts, and allow them to rest whilst working complete opposites on a different day.

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 3 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      No; that's fine. You can replace any of the exercises with a suitable alternative. And whilst cable crossovers are not as effective as pressing movements, you are pressing on the other two days so it's ok.

    • profile image

      Peter 3 months ago

      Hi Dave

      Thanks for your reply,

      If I was to do the three day routine do you see anything wrong in doing

      Say for Chest one day incline DB Press then next session Dips and third session

      Just cable Crossovers would that offer good stimuli

      Regards

      Pete

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 3 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Hi Peter. The second routine described in this article is more for people who have been training for a while. You train three days per week, but do a different set of lifts on each day. Or you could try an upper/lower type split (see my article on this) training three days per week but alternating four different workouts (two upper and two lower). That's what I'm doing at present.

    • profile image

      Peter Michaels 3 months ago

      Hi Dave,

      I am 43 been traing 25 years on and off I have never progressed on a split, but done lot better on a three day a week moderate and frequent training, please can you devise a full body workout for me being a more intermediate trainer plus I believe I have reached much of my potential already, thank you so much, keep the great work up

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 3 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yep; that's fine Tanveer. Best of luck with that.

    • profile image

      Tanveer 3 months ago

      I appreciate your help. Thanks.

      I have just started your program replacing parallel bar dips with close grip bench press. Doing in A B A. B A B fashion.

      Workout 1

      Squat

      Bench Press

      Bent-Over Row

      Barbell Curls

      Workout 2

      Deadlift

      Overhead Press

      Chin-ups

      Parallel Bar Dips

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 4 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      I'd do 3 X 6 - 8. The older you get the less volume you are able to tolerate, so that should be plenty.

    • profile image

      TANVEER 4 months ago

      I m 51 years male of 5 feet 10 inches. Doing Workout off and on for 1year. Reduced my weight from 126 kg . I liked your full body basic/ beginner workout plan. Should I do it in 3 x 6 - 8 or 4 x 6- 8. Kindly guide

    • profile image

      AD3EL 5 months ago

      thanks i appreciated

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 5 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      It should work well; but unfortunately everyone is different and different people respond to different things. People like yourself who struggle to make gains may have to experiment to find what works best. But this routine should build you a good solid foundation. Just train hard, but not to failure, as this will soon burn you out. Eat a calorie surplus with plenty of protein and get sufficient sleep.

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 5 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Between 4 and 8 sets of 2 or 3 reps. Don't do this if you are a beginner. Always use submaximal weights when training in these lower rep ranges, e.g. 5 sets of 3 using your 5 rep max weight. Never go to failure or grind out reps. Start with the lower end of the volume scale and increase gradually over time. Then decrease to allow fatigue to dissipate. Hope that helps.

    • profile image

      J.w. 5 months ago

      I'm not sure what you mean about 4-8 sets of doubles and triples. Can you explain please

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 6 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Glad to hear you have done so well with full body workouts Wade. Yes Leroy is great :)

    • profile image

      Wade Race 6 months ago

      My weight workout consists of trap bar deadlifts, DB OHPs, weighted dips and chins, and EZ bar French presses superset with EZ bar curls. I'll sprint or box on the off days. I recommend this routine so much because full body workouts combined with better eating habits have gotten me bigger, stronger, faster, and lost me 15lbs of fat weight.

      Leroy the Legend!

    • profile image

      Wade Race 6 months ago

      I love full body! I do 2 full body calisthenics workouts and 1 weight workout a week. Workout A is HSPUs, pushups, pullups, inverted rows, and burpees. Workout B is squats, chins, dips, hanging leg raises, and back bridge-ups

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 7 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      You can do it either way. For maximim strength use about your 3 - 5 rep max. Or for power (speed) work use about 65% of your one rep max.

    • profile image

      Me 7 months ago

      Hi, so when doing 2-3 reps with 4-8 sets. Should the weight be heavy or lite ?

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 8 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Glad to be of help. :)

    • profile image

      LookBackDontStare 8 months ago

      Thank you for your response

      I was resting two minutes between sets but maybe I was pushing too much weight for 8 in my first set which obviously impacted on sets two and three.

      Thanks

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 8 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      The idea is to increase the weight when you can do 8 reps on all 3 sets. But generally speaking if you do 8 on your first set you should be able to do it on all of them as you should really be stopping your first set a rep or two short of failure. So the only reason you should go below 8 on subsequent sets is if your rest periods are too short. If you push to your max on all your sets you will find your progress will grind to a halt much sooner than if you hold back a little.

    • profile image

      LookBackDontStare 8 months ago

      Hi David, hope you're well.

      I've been doing your routine as discussed for just over three months now and wanted to ask about progression within weights/reps.

      I've found in the last couple weeks that my progress is starting to slow down. I'm still looking to run the routine as prescribed with the exercises written and the reps between 5-8.

      My question is...Should I only be progressing/increasing my weight when I can hit all 8 reps on all three working sets, then increase the next session? or If I hit 8 reps on my first set should I increase the weight straight away?

      Hope this makes sense and you can help...again

      Thanks

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 10 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      If you are a complete beginner I recommend you do it as written at least for your first few months. After that you can add in an extra exercise or two if you wish.

      Do it for as long as you are making progress, but at some point you'll probably do better if you switch to an upper/lower split (see my article on that).

      And yes you can do close grip bench instead of parallel bar dips.

    • profile image

      Daniel 10 months ago

      and 1 more question

      can i change dips with close grip bench ? would it have the same effect?

    • profile image

      daniel 10 months ago

      thanks for the quick response

      do you recommend the program you posted in the article just the way it is or it ok to add some exercises?

      and for how long should i use this routine?

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 10 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      You are alternating between a vertical push and a horizontal push, but chest is still trained on your overhead pressing days with parallel bar dips.

      Yes, use the same weight for all your work sets, but do warm-up sets first.

      Do 3 sets for barbell curls, and 2 sets for parallel bar dips.

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 10 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes that's perfectly fine; in fact it's recommended. Have at least one day per week completely off though.

    • profile image

      Prashanth 10 months ago

      Many Thanks for the insight. Please suggest if we can do 20-min of light cardio say treadmill walk on 'off' days.

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 11 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      The reason I have hammer curls is that triceps have been worked hard just two days earlier with parallel bar dips. But if you feel your triceps need more work, proportional to your biceps, it would be ok to have skullcrushers here.

    • Mattew James profile image

      Mattew James 11 months ago

      Thank for your response David ;)

      On the day three, i have replace hammer curl by skull crushers, do you think is the good idea or is best to stay with the hammer curl ?

      Matt

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 11 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      The two workout plan is probably best for complete beginners, but after you've been training a while you may find you do better with the three workout plan. And your version of the three workout plan is perfectly fine.

    • Mattew James profile image

      Mattew James 11 months ago

      Hi David,

      What do you think of this routine on three days :

      Day one :

      - Squat

      - Bench press

      - Barbell row

      - Barbell curl

      Day two :

      - Dead lift

      - Push press

      - Lat pulldown or Pullups

      - Dips

      Day three :

      - Leg press

      - Incline barbell press

      - Cable low row

      - Skull crushers

      Thank you

      Matt

    • Mattew James profile image

      Mattew James 11 months ago

      ok thank you !!

      What is the best routine in your opinion?

      The one over two days or the one over three days?

      I prefer this on two days ...

      Matt

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 11 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes Mat, you could replace the lat pulldowns with cable rows if you wish.

    • Mattew James profile image

      Mattew James 11 months ago

      Hello, thank you for this excellent article.

      I practice the routine over three days that you described in your article.

      I have a question about working back on day two.

      By which I could replace the lat pulldown, because it looks a lot like the pulls, and it's a bit too much for me.

      Thank you very much and sorry for my English because I am French ...

      Mat

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 11 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Hi Sara; you need to do squats and make sure you hit parallel with them. Really flex your but as you push up. Also sumo deadlifts. Again focus on the but. Hip thrusts are good too. Eat at a modest calorie deficit, with little if any junk food. And you could get a regular massage and/or skin brushing for the area too. Read my article on weight training for women on my website (whatreallybuildsmuscle.com) if you wish.

    • profile image

      sara 11 months ago

      Great article .. i was doing spilt days but i just dont like it im going gym for 3 days but i want a routine that foucs more in my butt ( cellulite ) what should i do ?!! Plz

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 12 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Glad to help LookBackDontStare. Chin-ups have slightly more biceps involvement than pull-ups, but you can do pull-ups if you prefer. No big deal either way.

    • profile image

      LookBackDontStare 12 months ago

      Thank you your quick response, I think I'll utilize your workout routine of the full body split into two different shorter workouts and do three working sets for each exercise.

      Just a quick question (again), on Workout 2 why have you selected chin ups and not pull ups? Thank you again for taking the time to write back, you've been very helpful :-)

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 12 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Good to hear from you LookBackDontStare. Your trainer is right in that doing 2 sets will be plenty if you are doing all those exercises 3 times per week. And that schedule will be fine for a while if you are a total beginner and only using light weights. But it will soon become too much and you will make better, more consistent long term progress with my routine.

      I'd stick to 3 working sets most of the time though (rather than 4); and 2 sets of deadlifts is plenty. In fact I made my best progress just doing one working set of 5 reps on the deadlift. Best of luck.

    • profile image

      LookBackDontStare 12 months ago

      Hi David

      I really enjoyed reading this article, very informative and helpful. I just have a question in regards to the way you split your full body into two workouts.

      I've recently had a gym session with a personal trainer who recommended a full body workout with pretty much the same exercises and rep range 5-8 you've mentioned here. His routine was:

      Bench Press, Squat, Barbell Row, Overhead Press, Dips, Chin Ups, Deadlift in that order. Doing two working sets per exercise for 5-8 reps and using progressive overload over the next few weeks and months. To do this routine three times a week (Mon, Wed, Fri). He mentioned that two working sets per exercise is enough per workout as all the muscle groups are worked across several exercises.

      I just wanted to know what are the pro/cons to doing two working sets of seven exercises three times a week compared to doing 3-4 sets of 4 exercises three times a week like you've written here.

      I'm just a little worried about starting the trainer's full body routine if there's a slight modification (like yours) which would be more beneficial in the long term and provide more sustainable results.

      Look forward to hearing back from you

    • greenmind profile image

      GreenMind 12 months ago from USA

      Brief and to the point. well-done, thanks!

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 14 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Ayman - sorry I only just saw your comment. I suggest you go over to my personal site whatreallybuildsmuscle.com and read the best fat loss diet plan. You could also read how to get six pack abs if you wish. Best of luck.

    • dwelburn profile image
      Author

      David 14 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes, hack squats would be good, but if you don't have a hack machine, doing leg press twice per week is fine. Though you might want to do a different rep range each time. Say 6 - 8 reps one day and 8 - 10 reps the other.

    • profile image

      Lexar 14 months ago

      Thank you for the feedback! Considering I don't have a squat rack do you suggest I just remove smith machine and use leg presses? Or is there another exercise I can use to build mass?

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 14 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes; I think that's a good well-balanced routine. I can see you are doing quite a lot of volume for your legs, so I hope that's working out for you. Personally I don't like Smith Machine squats (or much else on the Smith for that matter), but apart from that, yes you should do well with that, and you are making the most of only having two workouts per week.

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      Lexar 14 months ago

      Great article!! I only have time for working out 2x per week but still want to build mass.

      I used to work out years ago but am now trying to restart again, I would say I am beginner/intermediate. My legs are also falling behind so I upped the leg sets to increase some mass.

      (The gym I use is at work, very convient and free, but doesn't have a squat rack or barbell for bench pressing but has lots of machines, smith machine, and dumbell, kettle balls.)

      Day 1

      -------

      Leg press 4x8

      Dumbell Lung 3x8

      Pull up 3x8

      T bar row 2x8

      Machine bench press 3x8

      Machine Pec Deck fly 2x8

      Dumbbell shoulder press 3x8

      Dumbell lateral raise / superset with machine delt reverse fly 2x8

      Day 2

      -------

      Smith machine squat 4x8

      leg curl 3x8

      Pull up 3x8

      T bar row 2x8

      Dumbell incline press 3x8

      Machine Pec deck fly 2x8

      Machine shoulder press 3x8

      Dumbell lateral raise / superset with machine delt reverse fly 2x8

      What do you think of my routine?

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      Ayman 18 months ago

      Hello,

      I did the seven day work out provided here on calorie bee, along with my own workouts until I got my weight to a weight I am comfortable at. However, I need a diet plan to reduce my body fat (yes six pack goals) in order to get more cut. Do you have any plans that wont take too long? if not, do you recommend any diet plans to get ripped? I thought of redoing the seven day diet plan to help me get ripped, would you recommend that ?

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 19 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Actually the information here is totally accurate, as I am not talking to "reputable bodybuilders". I am talking to beginners who want to pack on as much muscle as possible as quickly as possible - and this is absolutely the best way to do it.

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      Joe Cseko jr 19 months ago

      The amount of erroneous information in this article, as well as in the comments section is absolutely staggering. Not a single reputable bodybuilder on the planet still does a full body workout.

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 19 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Whey protein and creatine. BCAA's if you are over 40. Also omega 3's, beta alanine, vitamin D and B vitamins are very useful. A multivitamin or greens supplement if you don't eat plenty of vegetables.

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      SHAHRUKH 19 months ago

      plz tell me best suppliment for muscles

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 19 months ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Thanks Anton; yes that's a pretty decent program, though personally I'd substitute pull-ups for pulldowns. Try about 3 sets of 6 - 8 for your main exercises and 8 - 10 reps for the smaller exercises.

      As for diet, I have a hub on eating to build muscle. Or over at my website (whatreallybuildsmuscle.com) there's an explanation of my favorite dietary protocol - The Renegade Diet.

      Best of luck.

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      Anton 19 months ago

      Hey your article i very helpful and I love it :)

      I would really appreciate if you could help me with this:

      I found this program suitable for me, what do you think about it? And how many rep and set do you recommend I do?

      Btw I'm 17 years old wight 59 kg/130 pounds and I'm 5,6/170 cm.

      Also can you give me a nutrition advice or program? Thank you :)

      The Program:

      Day 1:

      Squat

      Bench Press

      Lat pulldown

      Military press

      Barbell curls

      Ab machine

      Day 2:

      Deadlift

      Bent over rows

      Incline dumbbell bench press

      Lateral raises

      Tricep extensions

      Hammer curls

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 years ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Depends on the level you are at and how many times per week you train each body part. This article is meant for beginners/early intermediates and 3 sets per body part is fine. When you are a bit more advanced you will need more (say 5 - 8 for large body parts and 3 - 6 for small body parts), but each body part will be trained about twice per week.

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      john 2 years ago

      Hello Dwelburn so what is the best number of set you should do for each body part if you want to build strength and mass. I see some say 5 set I see some saying more so what the best number. should you do 3 set per body part each workout?

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 years ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Best of luck John.

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      John 2 years ago

      Thanks Dwelburn. I have been training for year. I am 47 years old and working out 4 days a week. But looks like I can train more with only 3 days a week and I able to hit everybody part. I am also trying to get my body to rest so it can grow. so I going from a 4 day split to a 3 day full.

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 years ago from Chesterfield, UK

      If you are an absolute beginner I would say it's a bit more than you need. But if you've been training a few months it's fine. I would not add the extra arm work though. One for bi's and one for tri's is enough when you're doing them three days per week. Also I would not do two ab exercises three days per week personally either, unless you only do one or two sets of each.

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      John 2 years ago

      Hello so I have 3 workouts Monday Wednesday and Friday. For legs squats day one day 2 leg press day 3 Deadlifts. Press day one military press day 2 Bench press day 3 Incline press . Every day I have one Tricep with one Bicep. Thinking of going one more on Triceps and Biceps. Back day 1 T-bar day 2 bent row day 3 well there Deadlifts and pull ups or pull down. upper and lower abs 3 time a week calf also 3 times a week. workout last 1 hour. Is this To much or is this Okay.

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 years ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes you should do every major muscle group three times per week, but this can be with different exercises. Or you can simply do squat or deadlift with upper body push and upper body pull. So it's ok to split shoulders and chest. But of course if you add dips to shoulder day you'll be working chest as well.

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      john 2 years ago

      Hello so on a full body workout should I Do every body part 3 times a week. for example squats bench press, shoulder press Biceps Tric calf and ABS. I split shoulder and chest.

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 years ago from Chesterfield, UK

      You are welcome; glad to be of help. :)

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      Stig 2 years ago

      Yeah ok, I agree. Thanks for an informative reply ! :)

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 years ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes that looks like a great routine Stig. Though you might find doing back squats three times per week will get a bit too much after a while, so you could do front squats on your deadlift day instead.

      Also I personally would do parallel bar dips on your deadlift day too, as this will give the triceps the extra work they need as well as giving the chest some work on this day too. If you want to keep the number of exercises the same you could drop the wrist work on that day.

      And I wouldn't do quite such high reps for calves. I know a lot of people say you should, but really 10 - 12 will give the best results.

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      Stig 2 years ago

      Hey, I can see you are someone who knows what he is talking about. I am going to do full body workouts until I have all the mass, then switch to splits with more isolation exercises to further mold that mass into art.

      My full body workout as of now ( will use this for as long as I get gains ) ;

      - where it says 5x5 means 2 warmup sets of 60% and then 80% followed by 3 working sets.

      On the isolation exercises there is of course no warmup.

      Workout A:

      Back Squats 5×5

      Chin-Ups 5×5

      Bench Press 5×5

      Barbell Curls 2×10

      Wrist Work 2×10

      Calves 2×15-20

      Workout B:

      Back Squats 5×5

      Rows 5×5

      Standing Press 5×5

      Deadlifts 3×5 (2 warm-up sets and 1 working set)

      Wrist Work 2×10

      Calves 2×15-20

      Training Schedule:

      Week 1: A, B, A

      Week 2: B, A, B

      Week 3: A, B, A and so forth.

      Whats your opinion on this? Is this a good routine? - I plan to do this 5 rep heavy stuff most of the time and then after some months take 1-2 months of 10-12 reps to stimulate more hypertrophy from the heavier weights I can now lift because of all the heavy work :D

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 years ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yes; that's what I'd do. It's not a hub, it's on my blog. Click on my website icon on my profile page here to take you to it. The post is called 'How To Lose Fat Without Losing Muscle'.

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      Jack 2 years ago

      So should there be a day committed to testing your three rep max after the 3 sessions of 6 times 3?

      What is the hub called?

      Thanks

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 years ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Yep that's right. Thanks Entourage.

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      Stuart 2 years ago from Santa Barbara, CA

      I agree, go down on weight a little bit and do 3 reps. Once you do that you should be able to decide which weight is appropriate for you if you max out with one rep. Great article by the way dwelburn.

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 years ago from Chesterfield, UK

      No it's not, but it does discuss carb cycling as one of the 8 points to maintaining muscle whilst losing fat.

      Monday is the start of the week :)

      I would not do a de-load unless you have been stuck for 3 weeks. However you don't have to keep testing your one rep maxes if you don't want to as they do get a bit demanding. Just test your 3 rep max and calculate from that if you prefer.

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      Jack 2 years ago

      Thanks. Is the article the one about carbohydrate cycling? I did a HIIT session four days in a row, Friday-Monday, but assuming Sunday is the start of a new week, I am still in the exact range of doing 2-3 HIIT sessions a week if I am done for the week or only do one more.

      I am currently on a de-load because when testing my one rep maxes last week, the weight I could bench declined. Given this, do you think a de-load was the right option? I feel the one-rep max is so mental and takes a lot of toughness.

    • dwelburn profile image
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      David 2 years ago from Chesterfield, UK

      Sounds a good HII routine; but I would not do it 5 - 6 times per week if you want to maintain your muscle mass. 3 is plenty; 4 is maximum. I have an article specifically about how to lose fat without losing muscle on my blog that you may find of interest.